Home Authors Posts by South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) Press

South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) Press

South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) Press
16 POSTS 0 JOBS
The South African Film & Television Awards – SAFTA’s, is an annual celebration awarding the best in Film & TV talent South Africa has to offer.

SAFTAs12 nominee series: Apocalypse Now Now

The 12th annual South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) will take place on 22 and 24 March 2018 at Sun City Resort in the North West Province. Managed under the custodianship of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) – an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture – the SAFTAs committee consists of the SABC, DStv, M-Net, e.tv, StarSat, the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) and the South African Screen Federation (SASFED).

Screen Africa chats to Michael Matthews, director of 2018 SAFTA-nominated short film Apocalypse Now Now:

What inspired the making of the short?

It’s based on a twisted South African Book with the same name, Apocalypse Now Now, by Charlie Human. We’re excited about doing different styles of genre in a unique way, so this is perfect for us! But mostly the book is just ridiculous good fun, and the inspiration behind the film. This short has been made to accompany the feature script which we hope to finance in the next six months.

What do you attribute its success to?

The close team we have worked with to create this, and also worked with on our first feature, Five Fingers for Marseilles. Too many names to list here, but everyone gave so much time and effort to the project and it wouldn’t exist without them. We had very limited money, so it was favours from everyone. Intelligent Creature in Toronto did the CG creature, and that was also a major element to the short films success. The lead producer, Todd Brown, brought the project to us and got the ball rolling, so none of this would have happened without him.

What will winning the SAFTA mean to you?

It’s great to be a part of the industry at the moment, with so much great talent beginning to shine.  It’s rewarding to be acknowledged. Hopefully it will spark more relationships and friendships in the industry, and we’ll see the feature version of this sooner that we think.

Keep up with all the SAFTAs12 action on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

 

SAFTAs12 nominee series: Q&A with Skulls Of My People director Vincent Moloi

The 12th annual South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) will take place on 22 and 24 March 2018 at Sun City Resort in the North West Province. Managed under the custodianship of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) – an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture – the SAFTAs committee consists of the SABC, DStv, M-Net, e.tv, StarSat, the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) and the South African Screen Federation (SASFED).

Screen Africa chats to Vincent Moloi, director and producer of 2018 multi SAFTA-nominated documentary Skulls Of My People:

What inspired the making of Skulls Of My People?

Skulls Of My People felt like a spiritual obligation. It just had to be done, especially in the current social political climate where issues of land redistribution is being discussed. And what better way is there than to have a documentary as a catalyst for this conversation.

What do you attribute its success to?

Because it purely came from the heart. You can literally feel the energy of the people behind the project.

What will winning a 2018 SAFTA mean to you and the rest of the crew?

It will be such fulfilment especially because at first we struggled getting funding because people told us there is no story. And so winning a SAFTA will be a good validation. But also will highlight the struggle of the people of Namibia especially the Nama and Herero people

Watch the trailer for Skulls Of My People.

Keep up with all the SAFTAs12 action on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

 

SAFTAs12 nominee series: Q&A with The Hangman director Zwelethu Radebe

The 12th annual South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) will take place on 22 and 24 March 2018 at Sun City Resort in the North West Province. Managed under the custodianship of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) – an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture – the SAFTAs committee consists of the SABC, DStv, M-Net, e.tv, StarSat, the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) and the South African Screen Federation (SASFED).

Screen Africa chats to Zwelethu Radebe, director and writer of 2018 SAFTA-nominated short film The Hangman:

What inspired the making of The Hangman?

What inspired me to write The Hangman was that I was curious to understand the motivations behind certain human behaviours and uncover a different perspective on the narrative of the black South African man both in the past and present. This is what brought about the sub-themes of identity and race.

What do you attribute its success to?

The film resonates with a lot of South Africans and international audiences both young and old for the simple fact that it uncovers a common human trait of keeping secrets and believing that it is for the good of others and then later experiencing the painful consequence of the truth once the secrets are revealed.

What will winning the SAFTA mean to you?

Winning the SAFTA will mean that The Hangman has made an impact and touched audiences and will hopefully positively influence and change minds and lives for the better.

Watch The Hangman trailer.

Keep up with all the SAFTAs12 action on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

SAFTAs12 nominee series: Q&A with SuzelleDIY director/producer Ari Kruger

The 12th annual South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) will take place on 22 and 24 March 2018 at Sun City Resort in the North West Province. Managed under the custodianship of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) – an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture – the SAFTAs committee consists of the SABC, DStv, M-Net, e.tv, StarSat, the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) and the South African Screen Federation (SASFED).

Screen Africa chatted to Ari Kruger, director and producer of 2018 SAFTA-nominated series SuzelleDIY:

What inspired you to make SuzelleDIY?

SuzelleDIY actually started as a passion project. We both [Kruger and his wife Julia Anastasopoulos] were working in the commercial industry at the time, myself as a director and Julia as an actress, and we had been trying to make something outside of our commercial work that we could do on the weekends. We made a couple of episodes and released them on YouTube and they quickly received a good response. We continued to make them and when our eleventh episode ‘How to make a braai-pie’ went viral, it changed our lives. SuzelleDIY has since become a South African brand, we’ve made books, branded content and grown the channel to over 25 millions views. Our episodes also play regularly on Comedy Central which has allowed a much broader audience to reach Suzelle.

What do you attribute its success to?

I think that SuzelleDIY became successful because of us being able to create from a place of playfulness. I think that is also why it has resonated with audiences as it feels genuine and funny. Besides for the entertainment factor there’s also real value to each episode as all of the hacks that Suzelle demonstrates are innovative and unusual. Suzelle’s message is also a positive one as she literally encourages people to do-it-yourself.

What will winning the SAFTA mean to you, Julia and the SuzelleDIY team?

It would be an honour to win a SAFTA — we never expected the show to become as successful as it became, so it would really just be fantastic to have it officially recognised by our industry.

Check out the SuzelleDIY YouTube channel.

Keep up with all the SAFTAs12 action on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

 

SAFTAs12 nominee series: Q&A with Strike a Rock producer/director Aliki Saragas

The 12th annual South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) will take place on 22 and 24 March 2018 at Sun City Resort in the North West Province. Managed under the custodianship of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) – an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture – the SAFTAs committee consists of the SABC, DStv, M-Net, e.tv, StarSat, the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) and the South African Screen Federation (SASFED).

Screen Africa chatted to Aliki Saragas, director and producer of 2018 SAFTA-nominated documentary, Strike a Rock:

What inspired you to make this documentary?

The realities of the devastation of the Marikana massacre that took place on 16 August 2012 is widely known and has been criticised globally, including in the award-winning film Miners Shot Down, produced by Uhuru Productions, the co-producers of Strike a Rock. But there are voices that have yet to be heard. Voices from the strong women leaders and the community that surrounds the mine have seemingly been erased from the narrative. Despite the international attention, inquiry and mass-activism that followed the massacre, living conditions for the Marikana community have worsened. There has been no accountability.

This is what drew me so powerfully to the story of Thumeka and Primrose, two grandmothers who were compelled by the tragedy they witnessed to take on leadership roles, exercising their agency and power. They force us to recognise that the story of Marikana is not yet over.

My aim was to weave together the perspectives of the women using a sensitive, unobtrusive and intimate camera. The film takes the viewer on a journey through trauma, history, loss, memory, friendship, and the fear of being further forgotten as Thumeka and Primrose survive each day. At the same time we are confronted with a very real obstruction of justice and lack of accountability on the side of Lonmin, who seemingly shirk their legal obligations to the community, and the South African government, who neglect to ensure that the required socio-economic development takes place. In this context, the personal becomes the political and that is where the impact of the film lies.

After over four years of creating this documentary the journey is only really beginning now, as we use the film to build on a movement focusing on extractive practices and their socio-economic and environmental impacts in South Africa and Southern Africa regionally. We hope the film will be a powerful tool in Sikhala Sonke’s struggle against poverty, while inspiring other women across the world who are taking a stand against oppression.

What do you attribute its success to?

I was fortunate enough to meet the most incredible, powerful women who are often leading the change and on the ground activism in Marikana. Women who were hardly known, but who I believe should be celebrated and recognised for their bravery and commitment to the fight for justice and accountability.

The film focusses on the activism of the Sikhala Sonke women’s organisation in Marikana and their leaders Primrose Sonti and Thumeka Magwangqana. I made a very important creative decision to keep the film incredibly intimate, and focus on telling the story through the women’s voices from the inside, rather than through external voices that have already shaped the discourse of the space. Right from the beginning the film has been a collaborative process, it was the most important thing.

Thumeka, Primrose and Sikhala Sonke knew that we had the same intention with the story and what we wanted it to do. That coupled with a very important creative decision to immerse myself with the women in their homes for four years helped us develop a very strong relationship, trust and mutual respect that extends way beyond the film. The film is a mouthpiece for their voices, as well as aims to continue the work they are already doing on public platform in bringing awareness and attention to their plights.

What will winning the 2018 SAFTA mean to you and the Strike a Rock cast and crew?

As a female filmmaker with my first documentary feature film, Strike a Rock, I am beyond overjoyed that we have been nominated in two categories at the SAFTAs. To win a SAFTA would be a dream come true as it is especially important to me, that as South Africans, we recognise narratives that show empowered, empowering and inspiring women, as well as celebrate the women working behind the lens. The people in my film are living examples of how women are at the forefront of change and of how vital it is that history is inclusive of these voices. The devastating effects of the Marikana massacre are still felt today by the people who were left behind and it’s my hope that the film has and will continue to make an impact in this community.

Watch the Strike a Rock trailer.

Keep up with all the SAFTAs12 action on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

SAFTAs12 nominee series: Q&A with Inxeba director John Trengove

The 12th annual South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) will take place on 22 and 24 March 2018 at Sun City Resort in the North West Province. Managed under the custodianship of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) – an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture – the SAFTAs committee consists of the SABC, DStv, M-Net, e.tv, StarSat, the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) and the South African Screen Federation (SASFED).

Screen Africa chatted to John Trengove, director of 2018 SAFTA-nominated film, Inxeba:

What inspired you to make this film?

We wanted to make a queer South African film and specifically speak about same sex desire in the context of traditional culture. We were frustrated with the way that gay characters were being treated in our films. We wanted to see more complex representations of the LGBTQI experience.

What do you attribute the film’s success to?

The film has come along at a time when there is a lot of heat around the subject of Ulwaluko as well as the plight of queer people throughout the African continent. It’s a love story, but it’s more than that, it deals with themes that the whole world is grappling with, specifically the consequences of toxic masculinity. Most importantly, the story is authentic. It’s based on things that have really happened to people and it’s performed by an all Xhosa cast.

What will winning the SAFTA this year mean to you and the Inxeba cast and crew?

The film is currently fighting for its rights not to be banned from South African screens. It means a lot to have the recognition and support of the industry since the fight for Inxeba has become a fight for artistic freedom.

Watch the Inxeba trailer.

Keep up with all the SAFTAs12 action on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Pin It on Pinterest